Camera basics - Sunny 16 Rule

 My friend Lisa taken on a medium format film camera. {London}

My friend Lisa taken on a medium format film camera. {London}

Can I just say I am NOT A CAMERA NERD.  I don't like talking about cameras and lenses and apertures.  It makes me feel all icky inside.  But I understand that sometimes I need to push myself outta of my creative comfort zone and talk nerd.  Just don't expect it too much ok.

So my first SLR was such an exciting purchase for me.  FINALLY I can take some amazing photos because I have this professional camera right?  I'll be a photographer in no time! Everyone will be so jealous of my photos right? Nope.  Roll after roll of film I got back I was so disappointed. Whhhhyyyyyyy am I not getting amazing results waaaaahhhh?  *insert emoji pulling hair out while chucking tanty*

The first mistake most of us make is not realising that a new camera is going to do crap all if we don't know how to utilise the beast first.  We HAVE to first understand the relationships between Aperture/Shutterspeed/ISO and how they affect each other.  Don't worry about anything else until you get this right.  Seriously stop playing with the "scene" mode or I'll smack you.....

 From DIY Photography 

From DIY Photography 

Soooooo I'm not here to teach you how to use your camera today.  I just wanted to share this cool - Sunny 16 Rule.  If you grew up with film cameras you might of heard of it or if you are a complete geek you might of but most probably wouldn't of because its really a film photography term.  BUT saying that it totally works on digital cameras too.  

Whats the point of it?  Well back in the day when everyone had film cameras they didn't have light meters like we have now.  We tend to click and look at screen, then adjust our settings.  Nothing wrong with that but it doesn't help with getting to know our equipment - you know I'm right.  Have you ever been in a situation where you wished you were a bit faster.....  didn't have to adjust your settings 5 times to get it right?   Well film photographers could do that, they knew what settings to use in different lighting situations - because they had to.  

The good news is.......you CAN do this too!  On a sunny day go outside and start with setting your ISO to 100, Shutter to 100 & Aperture to f/16.  

Have a play around with it.  See what happens if you decrease the aperture number 5 stops and increase the shutter number by the same......Its not as hard as it sounds.  Give it a go.  You'll be SO wrapped with yourself its seriously a cool exercise.  You'll be having Oprah moments I promise (ah haaaa, stay with me).

The chart you see above is not mine its from the DIY Photography site.  I recommend clicking on the link and having a read its really interesting.  He takes you through all the steps of getting a good exposure without looking at the back of your camera once.  Its a really good way to get your head around aperture/shutter/iso relationships.  

How about getting your camera out today and having a play.  Let me know how you go.

Bx